what a girl wants: fantasy diabetes device

May 16, 2012

I just want everything to be all in one place, easily accessed by all kinds of wireless devices, not exorbitant in price, covered by both private and government insurance as necessary, reliable, and accurate beyond any accuracy we think we have today.

My dream diabetes technology is something that does it ALL. By all, I mean:

  • continuously tests/checks/monitors glucose levels. I’m not rabid about where the glucose is found–blood or interstitial fluid, whatever works and is the best that science says it needs to be, but it has to be continuous as I want moment-in-time readings as well as trends.
  • infuses insanely pretty much instantaneous insulin, preferably directly into my blood. I know, that sounds scary and all, but really. We shouldn’t have to be waiting around forever to get insulin that might decide to work in the next 10, 20, 30 or more minutes under the fat layer of our skin and then wait for it to get into our bloodstream. That’s crazy talk, yet that’s our lives. And that’s just for the “rapid” acting insulin.
  • can point at food or beverage, look it up in some colossal carb/calorie/nutrition index in the cloud, and spit the carb count directly into my bolus formulas AND my downloadable logs! BOOM!
  • ALL my data, from all the glucose tests and monitoring and insulin infused and carbs eaten to all the exercise completed and stress levels and real people sickness and day of my cycle and HbA1c both current and historical and other health monitoring data from external tests and hell, let’s put amounts of SLEEP in there too.
  • available in pretty, easy-to-understand, colorful (but not TOO colorful) infographics.
  • let the data flow into reports or forms that look like log sheets, if that’s what the medical community needs to be able to understand it.
  • with reminders. and prompts. and fun messages from my endo and CDE.
  • instant messaging with them would be great as well.
  • I think I’m describing a device as well as an app. a power app. one that looks and operates the same on Apple or android. and is available on the web as well.
  • keep it all on the cloud. with all kinds of security and whatever else to keep it reasonably safe from being erroneously posted on my Facebook page, but really, honestly, I don’t care if it is. I just want it easy to access and available when I need it. And I want dr. wonderfulendo and CDE, dr. wonderfuleyeMD too, and whatever other medical professionals need it, to be able to access it too.
  • the device also needs to be tiny. Seriously tiny. I think I’m thinking of 1 device to wear, that would communicate with a smartphone or iPod, iPad,  computer, whatever.
I just want it to be easy and accurate. Condense all of the crap I have to carry with me everywhere, and condense the amount of crap I have to remember and do and figure out and share, so that I can concentrate on other things. And, as I’ve said before on a similar topic, make it look super cool and fun. A little glitter never hurt anything!
Check out what other d-bloggers have to say about this here.

D-Blog Week 2012, Day 4: Today let’s tackle an idea inspired by Bennet of Your Diabetes May Vary.  Tell us what your Fantasy Diabetes Device would be.  Think of your dream blood glucose checker, delivery system for insulin or other meds, magic carb counter, etc etc etc.  The sky is the limit – what would you love to see?


just call me jenga-girl

May 15, 2012

…in pure confessional mode tonight, especially since I’ve been quietly raging against planking blood sugars in the 160-199 range since about 4pm this afternoon. (It’s almost 11pm.)

I’m a stacker.

When I don’t pay attention. When it’s been a couple of hours and there is no down arrow on Dex the continuous glucose monitor. When a perfectly good, accurately-calculated correction bolus has been given ample time to work and yet that damn BG just. won’t. come. DOWN.

I stack correction boluses.

If I’m feeling extra special feisty, I’ll throw a bolus for some carbs in the middle of a correction bolus stack, because I’m just that pissed at the infernal high BG and I’m hungry.

Numerous times my CDE and endos have looked at my logsheets and mentioned, “You tend to stack a little.”

Sometimes the wonderful D-team will follow the previous observation with: “Do you think you could wait longer before you correct again? Maybe 4 hours?”

They see my face–4 hours? Seriously? “Well, how about 3?”

(I do mean it, they’re wonderful. They really read over my entire logsheets and ask good questions, and help me think through some solutions to my current d-dilemmas.)

Yes, I’m a stacker.

I don’t MEAN to do it, not in a “I’m going to intentionally harm myself because I don’t know well enough what I’m doing and/or I think it will be fun.”

But. Just about the most frustrated I ever get is when I’ve done all that I can do to get a high BG to lower, and it won’t budge. Over several hours. Sometimes I end up crying because it feels hopeless. And I just feel sick–headache, sick to my stomach, fuzzy teeth, dry mouth, a heavy feeling as if concrete is slooooooowly inching through my veins. Blech.

I stack those boluses.

I’m impatient, not only about high BGs coming down but about many many other things in life. I get impatient that correction boluses don’t work immediately, even though I use rapid-acting insulin.

Really? Rapid? It’s not rapid waiting hours and hours for a BG to come down. Not eating anything because I’m afraid of what will happen then. Guzzling water and sparkling water and diet soda and ice cubes while I just want to eat some real food.

This being my confession, I can also say that I have improved at not stacking so much over the last year or so. Yet the possibility of stacking is always there in the background. I have to be really mindful, all the time, and stop myself from giving another bolus when I still have insulin on board (IOB). It’s a process, for sure. But I have gotten better at blocking the stacking urge.

Like right now, for instance. BG is 224, it went UP in the last few hours! Grrrr. Now I’m thinking that I messed up the carb counting at dinner, which added to the stuck BG and risk of my stacking tonight.

And so I’ll start again tomorrow, trying and working hard not to stack. It’s a neverending process.

Check out the other posts about One Thing to Improve here.

D-Blog Week 2012, Day 3: Yesterday we gave ourselves and our loved ones a big pat on the back for one thing we are great at.  Today let’s look at the flip-side.  We probably all have one thing we could try to do better.  Why not make today the day we start working on it.  No judgments, no scolding, just sharing one small thing we can improve so the DOC can cheer us on!


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